Blogiversary~3 Years!

And I’m still here!  For the past 3 years, I’ve worked as hard as I have been able to to forward my genealogical education and experience.  I have to take the next step at some point…certification.  I knew I wanted to get my oldest son through graduation before going “on the clock,” and that has now happened.

It’s time.  I need to take that next step.  I must take that next step.

But, first…

I’ve decided to group my accomplishments and goals under my Four Cornerstones.

 <—To refresh your memory! *I need to change my name on that image…oops!

Time to review:

EDUCATION LOCAL HISTORY PROFESSIONALISM RESEARCH

Started this blog on 24 Jun 2014.

Became the county genealogist for Henry County through IGS in August 2015. Local History/Professionalism

Became the newest board member of the Henry County Historical Society & Museum in September 2015. Local History/Professionalism

General public meetings of ECIGA officially began in February 2016 (inclement weather canceled our very first meeting in January 2016). Education/Local History

Attended the IGS Conference in April 2015 and 2016.  Attended the Society Management Seminar in April 2015, 2016, and 2017. Education/Professionalism

Became NSDAR member in April 2015, Corresponding Secretary for my chapter 2016-17. Professionalism/Research

Elected Vice President of the Indiana Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists (ICHAP), term begins 1 July 2016.  On 1 July 2018, I move to being the President. Professionalism/Education

Attended INDAR State Conference (May 2017).  Did it!

Begin genealogical courses through DAR. Completed GEP I, II, and III! Education/Research

What I Want To Accomplish (June 2017-2018)!

Practice writing proof summaries and proof arguments. Have been working on these!

Write article for IGS Quarterly. Working on it!

Complete yearbook for Sarah Winston Henry NSDAR Chapter, 2017. Working on it!

Attend District INDAR meeting (August 2017). Planning on it!

Plan two-part workshop for ladies interested in joining DAR. Happening this summer!

Complete New Horizons course through DAR.  Working through that this year.

Order syllabi and/or presentations from FGS 2016 and APG PMC 2016. Planning on it!

Applied for waiting list for an upcoming ProGen Study Group!

Go ON THE CLOCK! MUST DO!!! After ProGen!

Long-Term Goals

Add two more of my ancestors to SCWFI (John Ford and Lyman S. Ford). Still working on it!

Begin working on NSDAR supplemental for William Ballard (born 1715). Need to do!

Finish studies through NGS (got this in under the wire! Signed up for the NGS Guide to Documentation and Source Citation!). Still need to do final course!

Attend FGS Annual Conference in 2018!  ECIGA plans to join FGS October 2017!

Attend APG’s PMC (Sept 2016, 2017). Really wanted to go but the Bicentennial Torch Relay goes through Henry County the day after and I don’t think I can squeeze both in.  Want to go in 2017 but too expensive (Washington DC).  Wait for it to come back around to Fort Wayne!

Join PALAM (Oct 2017). Need to do!

Planning for Henry County Bicentennial in 2022!

Go “on the clock”??? See above!

Apply for First Families of Ohio (James A. Fowler and his wife Elizabeth Devore). Need to do!

Compose my Project Pioneer project for young-at-heart folks in the senior living community to help them get their family trees online at FamilySearch.org. Working on it!

Here’s to another great year!

Webinar~Fire Insurance Maps…Google Maps of their Day! Plus Graduation!

Hosted by: Hamilton County (OH) Genealogical Society (thank you!)

Presented by: Jill Morrelli, CG

First, let me say I *big puffy heart* love Sanborn Fire Maps!  In my humble opinion, your genealogical research is lacking if you do not use this resource.  It is, in a word, indispensable!  So, when I heard about this webinar, I signed up immediately!  Right now, I’m creating a project using a story my grandfather wrote about a typical day in his life in 1933 when he was a high school senior.  He worked for a movie theater in the downtown area of our hometown, and his story is about him running an errand and running all about the downtown area, checking into different businesses and seeing different people.  He wrote this from memory for his 50th class reunion in 1983! I’m using the 1924 Sanborn Fire Map for our hometown to plot these businesses, as well as the contemporaneous city directory.  I’ve even created his avatar who will walk his remembered trail! That is his senior class picture attached to a generic body.  I think he’d approve!

Another way I’ve used Sanborn Fire Maps is to locate where my ancestors lived in Cincinnati prior to the interstates being built.  They lived very near the Ohio River.  I have used these maps in conjunction with Cincinnati’s city directories, which, again, another indispensable resource.  These ancestors rented a building and ran a dance hall out of it; I was able to find that location on a Sanborn Fire Map.  It is yet another structure no longer standing.

A third way I’ve used Sanborn Fire Maps is to find where my early Ohio ancestors lived in Butler County, Ohio, in a town named Darrville.

In Richmond, Indiana, the actual bound map books are at the Morrisson-Reeves Library.  The maps are on linen pages, making the book heavy.  When a new map was published, the old book was supposed to be destroyed but many were not.  If they were, however, the linen pages would be recycled as clothing (!) and the leather binding used on boats.

Public health service (see John Snow’s 1854 cholera map of London)

Purpose for fire insurance maps: Carriers insure for loss; not concentrating the coverage; want to know the risk for a particular building

No owners’ names! Will find building type, address, railroads and viaducts, names of additions, etc.

Map books large and heavy!

Great Fire of London, 1666: The beginning of fire insurance (1710); fire insurance in US by 1728, written in London

1790: First map published in Charleston, SC

1815: Lithographs to produce multiple maps; maps had to be drawn in a mirror image!

1850: Map created of NYC business district (George Hope)

1850: Map standardization with the companies to provide maximum info on the map

Black and white (mostly seen online), colored (usually Sanborn), colored and corrected (have layers of tiny papers when changes were made)

Daniel Alfred Sanborn (1827-1883), did 50+ maps from 1867-68!

A surveyor (“strider”) recorded each building in very fine detail

Maps were colored by hand!

Find digitized Sanborn Maps on Library of Congress website!  Also check Google, local libraries, and Indiana University.

Maps created for fire insurance companies where they had clients so some cities/towns with no clients were not mapped.

Always review the first page of a city’s/town’s map, lots of info!

Read the key for color coding!

Read the key for dwelling types!

Special Risks: Manufacturing

Who uses these maps? Urban historians, writers, architects, historic preservationists, genealogists! Also house historians and collectors.

You can analyze businesses using directories and censuses.

Use Google Maps to compare how neighborhoods appear.

Maps can also be used to analyze disasters (Fall River, Massachusetts, 1928).

So glad I was able to sit in on this webinar!  Now I’m off to check for maps online!

Before I forget, this happened:

Big day for all of us!  We extremely proud of his accomplishments thus far and what his future holds! Way to go Ben!!

Webinar~Archivists: Who Are They and What Do They Do?

Hosted by the Association of Professional Genealogists

About the Presenter:
Melissa Barker is a Certified Archives Records Manager currently working as the Houston County, Tennessee archivist. She is also a professional genealogist lecturing, teaching and writing about the genealogy research process, researching in archives and records preservation. She conducts virtual webinar presentations all across the United States for genealogical and historical societies. She writes a popular blog entitled “A Genealogist in the Archives.” She is the Reviews Editor for the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) magazine FORUM. She writes a bi-weekly advice column entitled “The Archive Lady” that can be viewed at www.GeneaBloggers.com. She has been researching her own family history for the past 26 years.

Don’t let age deter you from becoming an archivist!

You know you’re an archivist when working with “old” items (documents, photographs, ephemera, etc.) never gets old!

“Every genealogist should be an archivist and every archivist should be a genealogist!” ~ Melissa Barker ~ “An archivist’s work is never done!”

Archivist: Appraising, acquiring, arranging, describing, preserving, and providing access to records of enduring value

*Some people don’t know what an archivist or archives is; some people are overwhelmed when visiting an archives*

Check for state library and archives organizations for training!

Educational requirements vary from institution to institution.

Certified Archivist (C.A.) Certificate Program (Academy of Certified Archivists)

Society of American Archivists Certificate Program and Graduate Program in Archival Studies

Certified Archivist (C.A.): 1987, set standards for professional certification; today, there are 1,131 archivists in the US

Some have backgrounds in history, art, library science, etc.  Some are historians, archives directors, archives managers, records managers, librarians, etc.

Archivists who specialize: Specific type of collections (manuscripts, photographs), specific geographic location (southern states, midwestern states, Civil War), only work with born digital records (never on paper, electronic, digital photographs) or digitizing archived records, specific genre (women’s history, military history)

How to find a job? ArchivesGig.wordpress.com

Society of American Archivists career center

How to get experience? VOLUNTEER! County, state, and organizational archives.

“Lone Arranger” Succeeding in a Small Repository by Christina Zamon

Job Duties: Obtaining and accessing records, govt records transferred to archives; historical and genealogical records donations; every step of transfer or donation is documented (deed of gift); organize and store records (original order is essential); sorting, labeling, filing, and re-housing of records (archival quality boxes/file folders); create a finding aid; indexing; organizing records and artifacts for display; plan and arrange upcoming exhibits and displays; preservation and conservation (clean and flatten documents); daily statistics (sign-in book, records processed, requests, donations); correspondence; help with walk-in researchers, pull records and help read old handwriting; budget and purchasing (compile and present a budget for approval), take stock and purchase archival materials; apply for grant money (always looking for funding!); outreach (open houses, speak to local groups, host tours for schools and adult leadership groups)

Tools of the trade: White gloves, spatula for removing staples, brush, acid-free products

This was a truly wonderful webinar, very thorough and detailed, including many real-world examples.  I’m so glad I was able to view it live!

What I Learned from Colletta’s Lectures (presentation)

This is a PowerPoint I put together for a recent presentation.  I had spent a day listening to John Philip Colletta, PhD, talk about brick walls, passenger lists, and naturalization records.  I applied his techniques to my research and put it into a PowerPoint for ECIGA. Hope you enjoy!

 

New Position

The Association of Professional Genealogists (APGen.org) includes chapters, one of which is the Indiana Chapter.  I have been a member of APG for 2 years and a member of ICHAP for the last year.  Elections were held recently for chapter officers, and I won the Vice-President position.  I am very excited about this…remember my Four Cornerstones post?  One cornerstone is professionalism in genealogy.  And that is exactly what APG and ICHAP promote.  I’m looking forward to taking a more active role in this great group and supporting professionalism as genealogists.  This is a very exciting opportunity!  If you’re in Indiana and a member of APG and would like to become involved, please let me know!  We hold meetings online through GoToMeeting and plan at least one face-to-face get-together a year.

genealogy, genealogists, professionalism

Prompt #131

I came up with this one on my own!

#131: What is your favorite Helper? By Helper, I mean Hamburger, Chicken, and/or Tuna.

Hamburger wise, it’s Spaghetti. I’ve loved that one for at least 20 years!!

Tuna wise, it’s Tetrazzini.  Kinda like tuna spaghetti!

Chicken wise, I don’t know. I need to give those a spin.

 

Today, I’ve been considering the possibility of attending a genealogical institute next summer (2017), probably the Genealogical Research Institute in Pittsburgh (GRIP).  I’d like something more in-depth, education wise, than a conference at this point.  I am, however, planning on attending the APG PMC in Fort Wayne this summer…can’t wait for that!